Recent Changes

Friday, August 14

  1. page Movement edited ... Historically, movement has been a means to explore the relationship between self, environments…
    ...
    Historically, movement has been a means to explore the relationship between self, environments, and boundaries. Clashes in ancient Greek culture between mobile Sophists and the rooted Socrates (Montiglio, 2005, 152; Morgan, 2012, p. 413–37) suggest walking was related to ideas about thinking (Solnit, 2000, 14-16). The practice of walking, or flâneur, exemplified in Charles Baudelaire’s poetry, the 19th century “dandys”, and later thinkers like Walter Benjamin and Erving Goffman, developed as a means of inquiry about built and linguistic environments (McLeod Rogers, 2013) and a means of communicating resistance especially amidst the earlier French Revolution and modern Western protests and marches (Solnit, 2000, p. 214-231). Influenced by 1930s-1950s speech act theory, speech-gesture theory, mysticism and music, Kenneth Burke studied language’s edges and relationship to the body’s transformative power and conceptualized the body as “a site of movement and change” (Hawhee, 2009, p. 47). Thus, Hawhee argues, his later Communication contributions are clustered around the body (p. 5-6). Performance art in the 1960s centered process and emphasized walking, again, as a site of inquiry (Solnit, 2002, p. 267-276).
    Modernity, frequently deemed "an age of mobility," brought huge technological changes, anxious perceptions of lost stability and uniqueness, and shifts in thinking about chaos and order. Marxism and concerns about "annihilation of space by time" produced by capitalism's drive for productivity laid the ground work for a material sense of movement (Cresswell, 2006 p. 15-21). By the 20th century's end, movement is embedded in the work of theorists who posit space and everyday practices as socially produced (Lefebvre, 1991), linked to “speech acts” (de Certeau, 1984 (1988), 97-99) and important to understanding the syntax(es) of power (especially Lefebvre, Foucault, and de Certeau). With particular uptake for Communication, Lefebvre challenges theorists to de-abstract the Cartesian cogito, concepts of mental space,with analysis of social space (4-5). With an eye toward the power relations between producers and consumers, de Certeau marries style and use to argue that quotidian practices are complex and naturalized but may be sites of resistant tactics to “make do” against the strategies of the more powerful producers. The body’s movements on city streets are key sites for both theories (1984 (1988), 98-102, xiix-xx). Edward Soja and Lefebvre both highlight the dialectical relationship between space and time, and, with Foucault, the means of control (Soja, 1989; Foucault, 1977).
    ...
    “mobility turn” (Brouwer, 2007, n. 3)(Cresswell, 2006, ix) responded to
    ...
    and communication.
    Rhetoric’s

    Cultural concerns in communication were taken up early in the turn by Lawrence Grossberg who Rhetoric’s
    “material turn”,
    (view changes)
    8:39 pm
  2. page Movement edited ... “To move” may mean figuratively to alter opinions/actions and is often synonymous with persuas…
    ...
    “To move” may mean figuratively to alter opinions/actions and is often synonymous with persuasion. St. Augustine, echoing Cicero, explains that eloquence is to inform, delight and move/persuade (to action). He uses the Latin flecto which means to bend, turn, curve or to figuratively persuade. The OED traces “movement” back to late Middle English from Old French from medieval Latin movimentum, from Latin movere (move) not flecto.Connections between literal and figurative meanings of “movement” persist today though this entry focuses largely on physical movement.
    Gesture and the Body in Oratory
    ...
    the body (book III, chapter 1).(3.1). Roman rhetoricians
    ...
    to culture (Streeck(Streeck, 1993; 2009, p.
    Movement and the Body in Place
    ...
    poetry, the common practices of 19th century
    ...
    studied language’s edges and relationship to
    ...
    Thus, Hawhee arguesargues, his later
    ...
    p. 267-276).
    By

    Modernity, frequently deemed "an age of mobility," brought huge technological changes, anxious perceptions of lost stability and uniqueness, and shifts in thinking about chaos and order. Marxism and concerns about "annihilation of space by time" produced by capitalism's drive for productivity laid
    the endground work for a material sense of movement (Cresswell, 2006 p. 15-21). By the 20th century,century's end, movement as a concept is embedded
    ...
    socially produced (Lefebvre),(Lefebvre, 1991), linked to
    ...
    de Certeau). In reaction to the fragmentation of modernist and postmodernist thought, MarxistWith particular uptake for Communication, Lefebvre challenges
    ...
    social space which, he argues, will help facilitate more holistic analysis (4-5). With
    ...
    Certeau marries style__style and use
    ...
    producers. The the body’s movements
    ...
    98-102, xiix-xx). Edward Soja and Lefebvre both highlight the dialectical relationship between space and time, and, with Foucault, the means of control (Soja, 1989; Foucault, 1977).
    Many disciplines
    ...
    terms of space, the body and power.power but especially space and time which are, in terms of the 1990s "mobilities turn" deemed "the context for movement and the product of movement" (Cresswell, 2003, p. 4). James Carey’s
    ...
    and communication. Rhetoric’s
    Rhetoric’s
    “material turn”,
    (view changes)
    8:33 pm

Wednesday, August 12

  1. page Movement edited Literal and Figurative Movement “To move” may mean figuratively to alter opinions/actions and …

    Literal and Figurative Movement
    “To move” may mean figuratively to alter opinions/actions and is often synonymous with persuasion. St. Augustine, echoing Cicero, explains that eloquence is to inform, delight and move/persuade (to action). He uses the Latin flecto which means to bend, turn, curve or to figuratively persuade. The OED traces “movement” back to late Middle English from Old French from medieval Latin movimentum, from Latin movere (move) not flecto.Connections between literal and figurative meanings of “movement” persist today though this entry focuses largely on physical movement.
    Gesture and the Body in Oratory
    ...
    directly (De Oratoria )Oratore) Movement was
    Elocution, as an art and a science (Fenno 1878; Plumptre 1883), gradually waned amidst the 19th century shift to human psyche and by the 20th century to culture (Streeck 2009, p. 278). Largely outside of Communication, scholars theorized movement, “gestural theory”, at the center of a scientific account for language’s origin and the theory grew with 20th century primate research (Hewes 1973) and the 1970’s renewed academic interest in language origins (Armstrong 2008). Nonverbal research burgeoned in the 20th century undergirded by rigorous observation and by mid century nonverbal communication was theorized as a complex system like linguistics (Buck and Knapp, 2006). Highlighting a fault line in nonverbal research, Birdwhistell, delinked movement from language systems and theorized kinesics as its own contextually specific, learned and patterned system (Birdwhistell, 1952). Nonverbal Studies was rooted by the 1960s and producing courses, textbooks and popular press by the 1970s (Buck and Knapp, 2006). Gesture is still a rich research arena (see journal Gesture established in 2001).
    Movement and the Body in Place
    Historically, movement has been a means to explore the relationship between self, environments, and boundaries. Clashes in ancient Greek culture between mobile Sophists and the rooted Socrates (Montiglio, 2005, 152; Morgan, 2012, p. 413–37) suggest walking was related to ideas about thinking (Solnit, 2000, 14-16). The practice of walking, or flâneur, exemplified in Charles Baudelaire’s poetry, the common practices of 19th century “dandys”, and later thinkers like Walter Benjamin and Erving Goffman, developed as a means of inquiry about built and linguistic environments (McLeod Rogers, 2013) and a means of communicating resistance especially amidst the earlier French Revolution and modern Western protests and marches (Solnit, 2000, p. 214-231). Influenced by 1930s-1950s speech act theory, speech-gesture theory, mysticism and music, Kenneth Burke studied language’s relationship to the body’s transformative power and conceptualized the body as “a site of movement and change” (Hawhee, 2009, p. 47). Thus, Hawhee argues his later Communication contributions are clustered around the body (p. 5-6). Performance art in the 1960s centered process and emphasized walking, again, as a site of inquiry (Solnit, 2002, p. 267-276).
    ...
    98-102, xiix-xx).
    Many disciplines took to the emergence of movement as a generative concept couched in terms of space, the body and power. James Carey’s work cast new communication technologies as important material concerns for space (Valdivia, 2010) helped ground materialist concerns and mobility studies (Sheller, 2013). The mid-1990s interdisciplinary “mobility turn” (Brouwer, 2007, n. 3) responded to a largely “a-mobile” sense of social science (Urray, 2008, 479). The concept matured amidst the nexus of space’s materiality, technology, power, and communication. Rhetoric’s “material turn”, expressed robustly in the 1999 Rhetorical Bodies (Selzer and Crowley), spurred many scholars to explore space/place rhetoric. However, Communication, like other fields, may have struggled with, at times, hazy analytical distinctions between metaphorical and material concepts of space (Shome, 2003). Communication has since wrestled with mobility in terms of migration, airports, technology, networks and the virtual world (Packer and Croft Wiley, 2013). The concept has been generative in terms of emphasizing everyday practices and as a critical framework. Rhetorician Daniel Brouwer uses mobility as a rich “conceptual framework” of “symbolic resource or material possibility” (2007, p. 703).
    Social Movements
    Studies of emotion, Deborah Gould in Moving Politics, connects early definitions of movement as motion, then emotion then rebellion. (2 of Intro)
    Then Morris and Browne.
    Where is the movement in social movements?

    (view changes)
    2:35 pm
  2. page Movement edited Literal and Figurative Movement “To move” may mean figuratively to alter opinions/actions and is …
    Literal and Figurative Movement
    “To move” may mean figuratively to alter opinions/actions and is often synonymous with persuasion. St. Augustine, echoing Cicero, explains that eloquence is to inform, delight and move/persuade (to action). He uses the Latin flecto which means to bend, turn, curve or to figuratively persuade. The OED traces “movement” back to late Middle English from Old French from medieval Latin movimentum, from Latin movere (move) not flecto.Connections between literal and figurative meanings of “movement” persist today though this entry focuses largely on physical movement.
    Gesture and the Body in Oratory
    Today’s public speaking textbooks define Aristotle’s delivery (see style) in terms of the body’s vocal, nonverbal and otherwise physical presentation though Aristotle’s delivery is more about vocal movements than the body (book III, chapter 1). Roman rhetoricians Cicero and Quintilian addressed the body in oratory more directly (De Oratoria ) Movement was important to communication from antiquity, as in mimesis or imitation which illustrates the bodily nature of Greek rhetoric (Hawhee, 2004), and as seen in Egyptian, Greek, and Hellenistic art (Streeck, 2008). The 18th century Elocution Movement foregrounded gesture but recast movement in terms of style instead of delivery (Buck and Knapp, 2006). In the vein of Quintilian, elocutionists characterized effective gestures as meaningful, natural and individually styled movements of the body, especially the hands and face (Sheridan (1968), p. 19, 118).
    Elocution, as an art and a science (Fenno 1878; Plumptre 1883), gradually waned amidst the 19th century shift to human psyche and by the 20th century to culture (Streeck 2009, p. 278). Largely outside of Communication, scholars theorized movement, “gestural theory”, at the center of a scientific account for language’s origin and the theory grew with 20th century primate research (Hewes 1973) and the 1970’s renewed academic interest in language origins (Armstrong 2008). Nonverbal research burgeoned in the 20th century undergirded by rigorous observation and by mid century nonverbal communication was theorized as a complex system like linguistics (Buck and Knapp, 2006). Highlighting a fault line in nonverbal research, Birdwhistell, delinked movement from language systems and theorized kinesics as its own contextually specific, learned and patterned system (Birdwhistell, 1952). Nonverbal Studies was rooted by the 1960s and producing courses, textbooks and popular press by the 1970s (Buck and Knapp, 2006). Gesture is still a rich research arena (see journal Gesture established in 2001).
    Movement and the Body in Place
    Historically, movement has been a means to explore the relationship between self, environments, and boundaries. Clashes in ancient Greek culture between mobile Sophists and the rooted Socrates (Montiglio, 2005, 152; Morgan, 2012, p. 413–37) suggest walking was related to ideas about thinking (Solnit, 2000, 14-16). The practice of walking, or flâneur, exemplified in Charles Baudelaire’s poetry, the common practices of 19th century “dandys”, and later thinkers like Walter Benjamin and Erving Goffman, developed as a means of inquiry about built and linguistic environments (McLeod Rogers, 2013) and a means of communicating resistance especially amidst the earlier French Revolution and modern Western protests and marches (Solnit, 2000, p. 214-231). Influenced by 1930s-1950s speech act theory, speech-gesture theory, mysticism and music, Kenneth Burke studied language’s relationship to the body’s transformative power and conceptualized the body as “a site of movement and change” (Hawhee, 2009, p. 47). Thus, Hawhee argues his later Communication contributions are clustered around the body (p. 5-6). Performance art in the 1960s centered process and emphasized walking, again, as a site of inquiry (Solnit, 2002, p. 267-276).
    By the end of the 20th century, movement as a concept is embedded in the work of theorists who posit space and everyday practices as socially produced (Lefebvre), linked to “speech acts” (de Certeau, 1984 (1988), 97-99) and important to understanding the syntax(es) of power (especially Lefebvre, Foucault, and de Certeau). In reaction to the fragmentation of modernist and postmodernist thought, Marxist Lefebvre challenges theorists to de-abstract the Cartesian cogito, concepts of mental space,with analysis of social space which, he argues, will help facilitate more holistic analysis (4-5). With an eye toward the power relations between producers and consumers, de Certeau marries style__ and use to argue that quotidian practices are complex and naturalized but may be sites of resistant tactics to “make do” against the strategies of the more powerful producers. The the body’s movements on city streets are key sites for both theories (1984 (1988), 98-102, xiix-xx).
    Many disciplines took to the emergence of movement as a generative concept couched in terms of space, the body and power. James Carey’s work cast new communication technologies as important material concerns for space (Valdivia, 2010) helped ground materialist concerns and mobility studies (Sheller, 2013). The mid-1990s interdisciplinary “mobility turn” (Brouwer, 2007, n. 3) responded to a largely “a-mobile” sense of social science (Urray, 2008, 479). The concept matured amidst the nexus of space’s materiality, technology, power, and communication. Rhetoric’s “material turn”, expressed robustly in the 1999 Rhetorical Bodies (Selzer and Crowley), spurred many scholars to explore space/place rhetoric. However, Communication, like other fields, may have struggled with, at times, hazy analytical distinctions between metaphorical and material concepts of space (Shome, 2003). Communication has since wrestled with mobility in terms of migration, airports, technology, networks and the virtual world (Packer and Croft Wiley, 2013). The concept has been generative in terms of emphasizing everyday practices and as a critical framework. Rhetorician Daniel Brouwer uses mobility as a rich “conceptual framework” of “symbolic resource or material possibility” (2007, p. 703).
    Social Movements
    Studies of emotion, Deborah Gould in Moving Politics, connects early definitions of movement as motion, then emotion then rebellion. (2 of Intro)
    Then Morris and Browne.
    Where is the movement in social movements?

    (view changes)
    2:32 pm
  3. 2:28 pm
  4. 2:28 pm
  5. tag_add Movement tagged style
    2:28 pm

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